Articles related to Teradata Database extensibility.

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How to Create and Debug an Aggregate JUDF using Eclipse

SQL provides a set of useful functions, but they might not satisfy all of the particular requirements you have to process your data.

User-defined functions (UDFs) allow you to extend SQL by writing your own functions in the Java programming language, installing them on the database, and then using them like standard SQL functions.

Teradata Database supports three types of Java UDFs. They are scalar UDF, aggregate UDF, and table UDF. 

How to Create and Debug a Scalar JUDF using Eclipse

SQL provides a set of useful functions, but they might not satisfy all of the particular requirements you have to process your data.

User-defined functions (UDFs) allow you to extend SQL by writing your own functions in the Java programming language, installing them on the database, and then using them like standard SQL functions.

Teradata Database supports three types of Java UDFs. They are scalar UDF, aggregate UDF, and table UDF. 

How to Set up a UDF / XSP Debugging Environment

An integrated development environment is crucial to software developers for editing, building and debugging their program all within one environment. Therefore, setting up the right development environment is an important first task.

Here we set up a User-defined Functions (UDFs) / External Stored Procedures (XSPs) debugging environment used to debug typical UDF/XSPs. Eclipse Indigo is used as the IDE. A Teradata Express (TDExpress) VM is used as the running DBS.

Putting Teradata Geospatial on the Map

Since Teradata first introduced native Geospatial capabilities in the database there have been inquiries about how to interoperate with the spatial data via client GIS and visualization tools.  In this article we are going to discuss how to view and edit spatial features and attributes maintained within Teradata in real-time by using the GeoServer web services.

Picture This - Teradata and Digital Image Processing

As most of you might agree, managing our collections of digitial pictures is becoming quite a challenge.  The number of photos continues to increase and now includes pictures from cameras as well as multiple mobile devices.  And to add to my troubles, I find that I have duplicate copies in different folders and on different computers.  Getting this organized is becoming a high priority.  Sure there are management solutions already available, but hey, we're tech people and it's more fun to try to build our own!  With the free Teradata Express database and some java coding, we have the right tools to get started.

Block Level Compression evaluation with the BLC utility

One of the new compression features in Teradata 13.10 is Block Level Compression (BLC), which provides the capability to perform compression on whole data blocks at the file system level before the data blocks are actually written to storage. Like any compression features, BLC helps save space and reduce I/O. 

There is a CPU cost to perform compression on inserting data. And there is a CPU cost to perform decompression on whole data blocks whenever the compressed data blocks are accessed. Even when only one column of a single row is needed, the whole data block must be decompressed. For updates, the compressed data blocks have to be decompressed first and then recompressed. Careful evaluations shall be done before applying BLC in your production systems.

Hadoop MapReduce Connector to Teradata EDW

Hadoop MapReduce programmers often find that it is more convenient and productive to have direct access from their MapReduce programs to data stored in a RDBMS such as Teradata Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) because:

  1. There is no benefit to exporting relational data into a flat file.
  2. There is no need to upload the file into the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS).
  3. There is no need to change and rerun the scripts/commands in the first two steps when they need to use different tables/columns in their MapReduce programs.
Geocoding 101

As Teradata customers discover and begin to utilize the native Teradata database geospatial capabilities, one of the first questions that inevitably comes up is, how do I “Geocode” my data?  In fact, Geocoding will often be an important first phase of any Geospatial implementation project and sometimes even a barrier to start the project all together.  The purpose of this article is to discuss what Geocoding is, how it works, Geocoding options, precision, and sources available today for Geocoded information.

Selecting an ALC compression algorithm

Teradata 13.10 provides Algorithmic Compression (ALC) feature that allows  users to apply compression / decompression functions on a specific column of character or byte type. The compression / decompression functions may be Teradata built-in functions provided along with ALC or user provided compression / decompression algorithm registered as UDFs.

Adding Geospatial Location Data - 2 Minute Guide

Teradata has added geospatial features to Teradata 13 (and earlier versions with the optional extension package - see my earlier article here).  These features enable powerful location based analytics, but often I'm asked how to get started, especially by customers who already capture Latitude/Longitude location data.  So to help, I've put together this quick 2 minute guide on converting your existing location data to the new ST_Geometry data type in Teradata so that you ca

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