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MLOADX is a new load utility enhancement introduced in Teradata Database 14.10 which is intended to overcome some of the limitations that are associated with standard MultiLoad.  This posting focuses on how workload management options will open up MLOADX for more expanded usage in Teradata Database 15.10.

I just returned from the 2013 Teradata user group Partners Conference in Dallas.  One of the technical topics that I presented at the conference was throttle rules and how they work.  Throttles provide concurrency control in TASM, both on the EDW and the Appliance platforms.   I'd like to share few points about enhancements to throttles in Teradata 14.0 and 14.10 that I discussed at the conference,  in particular automatic throttles.

Throttles are the most popular Teradata workload management option today. This webinar provides a simple yet thorough explanation of how these concurrency control rules actually work, reviewing the basics as well as focusing on important enhancements in the Teradata 13.10 and 14.0 releases.

Starting in Teradata 13.10, there is a single delay queue for all throttles.  This means that queries delayed by system throttles will reside in the same queue as queries delayed by workload throttles.  In earlier releases, delay queues were set up independently by type of throttle, and each workload throttle had its own dedicated queue.   

Bringing together all delayed objects into a single queue streamlines the entire throttling experience and makes it easier and more accurate to manage internally.  However, as a side-effect, the DelayTime field in DBQL needs a second look.  DelayTime takes requires slightly different interpretation in 13.10 than you gave it in earlier releases.

Have you ever wanted two levels of control on load utilities?  More specifically, have you ever wanted to limit how many load utilities a subset of users are able to run? This was not possible before, but it is something that is supported in the Teradata 13.10 release.  Let me explain how this works.    

Long before TASM, there were throttles.  We call them “system throttles” or “object throttles” today in order to differentiate them from TASM’s workload throttles.

Chances are that if you’re into workload management at all, your using at least one throttle. Maybe you are using more. On the other hand, maybe you’re just thinking about it. Object Throttles (as opposed to Workload Throttles) allow you stray from the straight and narrow, because they offer you an array of options and can be used creative combinations.

Please note:  This content does not apply for sites on Teradata 13.10 or later releases.

I just got back from speaking at the San Francisco Teradata User Group meeting and my topic included techniques for controlling concurrency of load utilities. When I polled the audience, I was surprised and disappointed that so few in the audience were using utility throttles.